Colors: Orange Color

By standard accounts felt made from wool is considered to be the oldest known textile. Multiple cultures spanning the nomadic Mongol and Turkic peoples as well as those of Sumer lay claim to legends of the origin of felt. Catholic tradition even tells the tale of Saint Clement and Saint Christopher who—while fleeing persecution— stuffed raw wool into their sandals to prevent blisters only to discover at the end of their journey the sweat and constant beating of their paces had felted the wool.

Red is an emotionally intense color that demands attention like no other—it is literally in our hearts and blood. Our summer‘s quest for passionate flo­­­­or fashion was fulfilled in all constructions and qualities from classic to modern design interpretations and everything in between.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s the rug industry began to see an increased number of traditional broadloom showrooms expanding into the area rug market, thus adding another layer of competition to the specialty rug showroom that continues to this day. This was a logical next step—the natural progression if you will—as the broadloom industry sought to capture more sales.

When we prompted a search for naturally-inspired rugs in organic tones using natural fibers like wool and silk, the responses we received were visually stunning and thought-provoking.

Tamarian’s Ned Baker reflected, “Nature has always had an important influence on the aesthetic of our work; from the use of renewable fibers such as hemp, allo, and sunpat in our weaving to the creation of our newer Silver Flax color palette that is inspired by natural tones, ‘bringing the outdoors in’ always elicits a positive response from the market and seems to satiate a certain desire we have to surround ourselves with the natural world, even when inside our home.”

Using an antique carpet in an interior setting should not be an intimidating affair. Sure, the Metropolitan Museum of Art is filled with rare and early examples that aren’t suitable for day-to-­­­day use, but there are enough available antique and vintage rugs on the market to cover the globe end to end.

Redone. Restored. Brought back. Revisited. Choose your own synonym for borrowing from classic style. Whether rugs, furniture or fashion, designers adapt traditional patterns in new colors, materials, finishes or techniques to suit modern tastes and to meet consumer demands.

Samad’s Kuma in Oyster from the Caspian Collection is a perfect example of such an adaptation in a new colorway. The reimagined Khotan from French Accents, which keeps true to antique weaving techniques, is modernized by “simplifying core patterns, colors and weaves.” Majestic Oushak from Harounian Rugs International (HRI) includes four classic designs from the company’s library of traditional designs—vibrantly recolored. 

How do you do new Oushak? Companies featured in our Fall 2022 style focus told us: It’s in the design refresh, the quality, the knot, the yarn, and the COLOR. Using phrases such as a fusion of modern and classic—you get the idea.

In an industry where the rectangle reigns supreme, is there room to invite some diversity of form? From lavish ovals such as the memphis-inspired Kolb by Hommés Studio to freeform flowers fresh from Inigo Elizalde there is much more to explore. Whether traditional round, runner, crescent, geometric or purely abstract, these trending silhouettes aren’t just trying to fit in!

“There are not many original shapes or silhouettes— only a million variations.“ ~ CHARLE JAMES