Colors: Orange Color

In the summer 2018 issue of RUG INSIDER Magazine we featured “The Rugs and Carpets of Fallingwater"—an exploration of the carpets which grace the floors of the renowned architectural masterpiece. Throughout that issue we also chronicled carpets in tune with David Bowie’s classic “Modern Love,” and offered a furtive look at the oft-copied Scandinavian aesthetic of Märta Måås-Fjetterström. Likewise, friend of RUG INSIDER Alicia Keshishian shared her opinions in “(Re)defining a Style” as we discussed the perennial “mid-century modern” aesthetic enjoying a resurgent popularity. 

What an incredibly strange world we live in currently. While it is true that among public health officials and epidemiologists the dangers of a pandemic have long been feared, who amongst the general population might have predicted one year ago that getting a haircut wouldn’t be possible?

Sellers of all manner of wares, particularly those crafted by hand, have long sought to offer the most authentic version of its class, including rugs and carpets. However, problems arise when the description doesn’t match the reality of the rug at hand. What is the modern consumer to do?­­­­­

It began as a novelty to encourage creativity during a spring interrupted by a pandemic. Created by RUG INSIDER Editor Michael Christie, the concept of #tableauxdepompoms is simple: recreate a commonplace scene from around the home or (home) office using color-matching poms—preferably with a timely, perhaps socio-economic message attached. That was the concept. For brilliant execution however, one need look no further than the “Bread and Roses” tableaux created by Catherine Bertulli in collaboration with photographer Dennis Geller.

Described by Jaipur Living as being “steeped in both history and modern style, the Reconnext collection by Jenny Jones combines globally-inspired motifs with on-trend colorways and re-imagined patterns,” Reconnext does precisely as the portmanteau implies: it reconnects us with the past as we look forward to what is next.

Hand-knotted in India of wool and silk utilizing a classic Persian knot, the recently-debuted collection is a melange of global design and influences. Whether it is the tartan patterns spied during a holiday on Spain’s Majorca island which inspired “Outlander” or the deep love for the rich and intricate culture of Japan fostered by exchange students in the 1990s which inspired “Kimono,” myriad influences recombine, if you will, to create new work with strong roots.

However, what intrigued us most here at Rug Insider was the interplay betwixt these two particular colorways in the collection. “Outlander” with its masculine energy and structured tartan (lede image), unified with the overtly feminine “Kimono” (above) through a moody and rich toasted palette of charcoal and caramel.

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Photographs courtesy of Jaipur Living

Tamarian is a well-known name among those who frequent markets in Atlanta and High Point, and has likewise been a fixture at events such as The Rug Show for decades. For those who purchase rugs and carpets at retail however, the name may be unknown. Rug Insider takes a look at the firm and its staff as they embark on a new journey of creativity (and branding) under the guidance of firm Principal, and now sole owner, Ryan Higgins.

The notion of a rug or carpet being quintessential—which is to say definitively indicative of the singular aesthetic of its maker— is certainly nothing new. In fact, it is quite time honored and traditional. Kerman, Kashan, Heriz, and Tabriz—to name but a few—are iconic and easily recognized examples of names that came to define aesthetics inherent to a specific place and indeed time. Then of course there are renowned makers such as Hadji Jalili whose work still inspires replicas, just as there are now innumerable Heriz, et alia, made in disparate lands and of varying quality. The quintessence of these latter versions being indicative of what they are, not what they purport to be.

Exclusive and unique, Samad’s Nirvana collection elevates the aesthetics of machine-made rugs to heights nearing that of some hand-knotted. Rug Insider finds out more.

On first glance the carpets of Samad’s Nirvana collection do not appear to be machine-made in construction—even to experienced rug and carpet professionals. Possessing a soft hand, a comparatively supple handle, and aesthetics comparable to many of the hand-knotted rugs and carpets which currently resonate with consumers, the Nirvana carpets strike a compelling balance between form, function, and price.